Oceanside mid-century studio seeks to extend analog life in digital age

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Walking into Oceanside’s Thunderbird Analog Recording Studio is like stepping a few years into the earlier — wood-paneled partitions, mid-century fashionable furnishings and traditional units and recording gear adorn every room in the 1970 developing.

Mementos from a few years of homegrown Southern California musicians fill the areas unclaimed by the devices of the energetic recording studio.

However, a modern rent spike is forcing proprietor, musician, engineer and self-described prepare dinner dinner and residential brewer Thomas Yearsley to seek for a model new residence for his studio.

“Our last party will be here Friday with (musician) Sue Palmer,” Yearsley talked about all through an open residence event Sunday. “It should be pretty big. Then I’ve got about a dozen or so tracking sessions, and in between I’ll just be breaking everything down and trying to find a place to put it.”

Thomas Yearsley with one of his stand up basses.

Oceanside, CA_6_12_22_ Thunderbird Analog Recording Studio in Oceanside, an old-fashioned studio, held an open residence Sunday to try to save their studio. Thomas Yearsley, proprietor for the ultimate seven years and bassist of the Paladins band reveals off actually one in all his stand up basses.

(John Gastaldo/For The San Diego Union-Tribune)

“Everything,” is sort of a bit. The studio is residence to numerous of Yearsley’s stand-up basses, an office, a T-shirt screen-printing operation, a file lathe from the Forties and a 24-track 2-inch tape machine from 1985.

The centerpiece of the developing — as quickly because the Oceanside residence of the defunct North County Times — is the ethereal recording and effectivity space, situated dead-center beneath a vaulted skylight that illuminates the studio’s grand piano and Hammond B3 organ.

This space, talked about Oceanside skateboarding legend-turned-professional-musician Adrian Demain, lets music “breathe” in a strategy fashionable soundproof studios do not.

“You get feedback from the room,” Demain talked about after a effectivity Sunday all through the open residence. “Not only do you feel it, but the instruments actually resonate differently when they’re in a place like this.”

Laura Jane Willcock, manager of the studio speaks to visitors at the studio during its Sunday open house.

Oceanside, CA_6_12_22_ Thunderbird Analog Recording Studio in Oceanside an old-fashioned studio, held an open residence Sunday to try to save their studio. Laura Jane Willcock, supervisor of the studio speaks to company on the studio all through its Sunday open residence.

(John Gastaldo/For The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Modern digital devices can replicate a number of of this impression, Demain talked about, nevertheless the experience for the musician and the viewers can’t be programmed right into a computer.

Yearsley talked about that’s mirrored in the recorded product, as successfully — which he explains as a type of magnetism. Magnetic tape, he talked about, captures and conveys human emotion in a strategy listeners could not perceive besides they listen to digital and analog recordings side by side.

“You’d be more impressed with the emotional impact of tape because it’s magnetic,” Yearsley talked about. “We’re magnetic people. Our blood is full of iron. The center of the earth is iron.”

Thunderbird was started by Yearsley in 1998 and has had three properties in that time. Yearsley, a founding member of the rockabilly band The Paladins, talked about he hopes to switch once more to the studio’s earlier residence at an earlier DMV developing on Wisconsin Avenue.

Thomas Yearsley, left in poster, and studio owner for the last seven years is bassist of the The Paladins.

Oceanside, CA_6_12_22_ Thunderbird Analog Recording Studio in Oceanside an old-fashioned studio, held an open residence Sunday to try to save their studio. Thomas Yearsley, left in poster, and studio proprietor for the ultimate seven years is bassist of the The Paladins.

(John Gastaldo/For The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Barring that, he talked about a vacant enterprise developing, equal to a restaurant space, would moreover work.

Money is an obstacle for the small grassroots studio. Yearsley talked about he’s saved pricing moderately priced to musicians, most of which can be native to Oceanside and North County. In order to solicit donations, Yearsley and his companion, musician Laura Jane Willcock, amongst others, are in the early ranges of launching the Thunderbird Analog Music Foundation as a nonprofit.

Willcock, whose band, The Tighten-Ups, is amongst Thunderbird’s regular of homegrown musicians, talked about the pandemic hit the studio laborious, since confined studio performances and recording lessons had been out of the question.

The potential nonprofit will depend on Thunderbird discovering a model new residence, Willcock talked about.

A Fender Telecaster and microphone sit against a vintage Sears Silvertone amplifier.

A Fender Telecaster and microphone sit in opposition to a traditional Sears Silvertone amplifier.

(John Gastaldo/For The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Demain talked about Oceanside isn’t merely shedding a enterprise if Thunderbird shutters fully — will most likely be shedding part of its group.

“A recording studio isn’t just a business that exists within the community,” Demain talked about. “It adds to the community, where artists can create something for the community. It’s having those kinds of things where artists here can create something in their hometown.”

The last effectivity on the studio is scheduled for Friday, June 17, at 1715 South Freeman Street in Oceanside.



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